Author: Wee Speech PC

Mindfulness

What is mindfulness?  Mindfulness is a state of being comprised of moment-to-moment awareness of our experiences without judgement. Another way to describe being mindful is to be present in the moment you are living in, without being overwhelmed by your thoughts.  How can we increase our mindfulness? The journey toward being mindful often involves feeling sensations in your body and also quieting your thoughts without judgement. Many activities can increase mindfulness, such as meditation, yoga, tai chi, or a simple (mindful) walk around a park. There will be more on strategies to increase mindfulness in future blog posts!  Why should we want to increase mindfulness? Research on mindfulness has indicated many benefits and although the majority of research studies have […]

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Metamorphabet

Metamorphabet is a visually striking app that introduces and plays with letters and words.  While it’s approach to letter-sound correspondence will also make it appropriate for older preschoolers, it’s easy interface and fun manipulation of letters and shapes into different words makes it accessible for 2-3 year olds as well.  It can be used to introduce and reinforce new vocabulary. Younger children will be able to tap, push and pull the letters into different shapes that become new words. The vocabulary presented is diverse and includes nouns, verbs and descriptives, and both abstract and concrete words. It has more common early vocabulary, such as car and eat, but also includes later-learned words, such as beard, jiggle and upset.  This app […]

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Communication Development and Screen Time

Technology is a part of our everyday lives. It is important to set boundaries and limits to children’s screen time so that their communication skills do not fall behind. In a poll of Speech Language Pathologists and Audiologist, the biggest concerns with children’s frequent screen time use include fewer opportunities for social interactions, delays in social development, delays in speech and/or language skills, and academic challenges. These concerns are present because children have fewer opportunities to hear language modeled by parents/peers and to practice their language, articulation, and social skills. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has established screen time guidelines to help parents balance technology and real-world experiences. They recommend no screen time (video chatting excluded) for the first […]

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Making Speech and Language Homework Fun

It can be difficult to get your child to practice their speech homework at home. There are some ways to make their homework a little more fun and motivating. You can turn their homework into a search and find game. Make binoculars out of a paper towel roll and have your child search for their speech sounds or vocabulary words. When they spot one of their words, they have to tell you what they found. This game can be used with any speech and language homework your child has. This is just one way to make practicing speech and language at home a little more fun. Leis, Kelly. Let’s Go on a Word Safari. The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. […]

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Tongue Thrust – What is it?

Tongue thrust also referred to as a “reverse swallow” is a common orofacial myofunctional disorder. It is a pattern where the tongue protrudes between the teeth while eating, speaking, or at rest. Causes There are many possible causes of tongue thrust including: Oral habits – thumb/finger sucking, extended pacifier use, etc. Respiratory issues – enlarged tonsils/adenoids, allergies, mouth breathing, etc. Premature loss of baby teeth which allows the tongue to move forward into the spaces created by missing teeth Difficulty with tongue coordination Heredity Effects of Tongue Thrust Over time, a tongue thrust can affect your child’s speech and the alignment of their teeth. When the tongue continually presses against the teeth, it can push the teeth out of alignment requiring […]

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Communicative Gestures Used as a Predictor for Later Language

A variety of gestures have been shown to be a predictor for later language development in children with autism, children with Down Syndrome, and typically developing children. Gestures are described as actions produced with the intent to communicate and are usually expressed using the fingers, hands, arms, and facial features. Early use of gestures has been linked to increased language production, language comprehension, and object naming. A child’s joint attention skills, such as giving or showing objects may also predict later language skills. Lack of joint attention behaviors between the ages of 2 and 3 years old may be an indication of developmental deficits. The frequency of gesture use as a form of intentional communication is an important factor when […]

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Phonological Awareness Activities Increase Literacy Skills

Research has shown that children given phonological awareness instruction in their first year of school have increased literacy skills. This was shown to be true for children with and without language disorders. After 10 weeks of phonological awareness instruction, these 5-year old children demonstrated greater gains in phonological awareness, reading, and spelling tasks compared to 5-year-olds that only received phonics-based literacy instruction. This study found that only 6% of the children who received phonological awareness instruction continued to demonstrate decoding difficulties. In contrast, 26% of the children who received phonics-based literacy instruction continued to have difficulty decoding following the 10 weeks of instruction. This research highlights the importance of understanding the sounds associated with letters and words for reading success. […]

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Reading Comprehension: Questions and Strategies

Do SLPs work on reading comprehension? Yes, SLPs are responsible for oral language (comprehension and expression) and literacy (reading, writing, and spelling). We can offer relevant skills for reading comprehension because we have knowledge of language subsystems (syntax, semantics, morphology, pragmatics) and development. SLPs understand how oral language skills transfer to reading. What is reading comprehension? Reading comprehension is a complex and active process where the reader applies meaning to what they read. What skills are involved in reading comprehension? Attention/memory Decoding Fluency Background/world knowledge Word/vocabulary knowledge What strategies can help develop reading comprehension abilities? There are many evidenced-based strategies that can support children with reading comprehension difficulties. The type of text (narrative or expository) can influence which type of […]

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Tips for Talking with Young Children who Stutter

Many young children go through a stage between the ages of 2-5 years when they may exhibit some stuttering. The first signs of stuttering tend to appear when a child is about18-24 months old as there is a burst in vocabulary and kids are starting to put words together to form longer utterances. In many cases, stuttering goes away on its own by age 5; in others, it lasts longer. Whether or not your child exhibits stuttering behaviors, here are some great tips to think about when you’re talking with him/her. 1. Speak in an unhurried way, pausing frequently. Model slow, relaxed speech for your child. 2. Reduce the number of questions you ask. Try commenting on what your child has said. […]

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