Author: Wee Speech PC

Metamorphabet

Metamorphabet is a visually striking app that introduces and plays with letters and words.  While it’s approach to letter-sound correspondence will also make it appropriate for older preschoolers, it’s easy interface and fun manipulation of letters and shapes into different words makes it accessible for 2-3 year olds as well.  It can be used to introduce and reinforce new vocabulary. Younger children will be able to tap, push and pull the letters into different shapes that become new words. The vocabulary presented is diverse and includes nouns, verbs and descriptives, and both abstract and concrete words. It has more common early vocabulary, such as car and eat, but also includes later-learned words, such as beard, jiggle and upset.  This app […]

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Tongue Thrust – What is it?

Tongue thrust also referred to as a “reverse swallow” is a common orofacial myofunctional disorder. It is a pattern where the tongue protrudes between the teeth while eating, speaking, or at rest. Causes There are many possible causes of tongue thrust including: Oral habits – thumb/finger sucking, extended pacifier use, etc. Respiratory issues – enlarged tonsils/adenoids, allergies, mouth breathing, etc. Premature loss of baby teeth which allows the tongue to move forward into the spaces created by missing teeth Difficulty with tongue coordination Heredity Effects of Tongue Thrust Over time, a tongue thrust can affect your child’s speech and the alignment of their teeth. When the tongue continually presses against the teeth, it can push the teeth out of alignment requiring […]

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Communicative Gestures Used as a Predictor for Later Language

A variety of gestures have been shown to be a predictor for later language development in children with autism, children with Down Syndrome, and typically developing children. Gestures are described as actions produced with the intent to communicate and are usually expressed using the fingers, hands, arms, and facial features. Early use of gestures has been linked to increased language production, language comprehension, and object naming. A child’s joint attention skills, such as giving or showing objects may also predict later language skills. Lack of joint attention behaviors between the ages of 2 and 3 years old may be an indication of developmental deficits. The frequency of gesture use as a form of intentional communication is an important factor when […]

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Reading Comprehension: Questions and Strategies

Do SLPs work on reading comprehension? Yes, SLPs are responsible for oral language (comprehension and expression) and literacy (reading, writing, and spelling). We can offer relevant skills for reading comprehension because we have knowledge of language subsystems (syntax, semantics, morphology, pragmatics) and development. SLPs understand how oral language skills transfer to reading. What is reading comprehension? Reading comprehension is a complex and active process where the reader applies meaning to what they read. What skills are involved in reading comprehension? Attention/memory Decoding Fluency Background/world knowledge Word/vocabulary knowledge What strategies can help develop reading comprehension abilities? There are many evidenced-based strategies that can support children with reading comprehension difficulties. The type of text (narrative or expository) can influence which type of […]

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Tips for Talking with Young Children who Stutter

Many young children go through a stage between the ages of 2-5 years when they may exhibit some stuttering. The first signs of stuttering tend to appear when a child is about18-24 months old as there is a burst in vocabulary and kids are starting to put words together to form longer utterances. In many cases, stuttering goes away on its own by age 5; in others, it lasts longer. Whether or not your child exhibits stuttering behaviors, here are some great tips to think about when you’re talking with him/her. 1. Speak in an unhurried way, pausing frequently. Model slow, relaxed speech for your child. 2. Reduce the number of questions you ask. Try commenting on what your child has said. […]

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10 Ways a Speech-Language Pathologist Can Help Your Child

Speech-Language Pathologists (or SLPs, as they’re often called) are experts in supporting communication. They work with children who present with a wide range of delays and disorders. You may be surprised to learn just how many areas an SLP can help your child with!1) Articulation Skills/Speech Intelligibility: SLPs teach children how to produce speech sounds and sound patterns, thus improving their ability to be understood by others.2) Expressive Language Skills: SLPs help children learn new words and teach them how to put words together to form phrases and sentences.3) Receptive Language/Listening Skills: SLPs help children understand language to improve their ability to follow directions, answer questions, and participate in conversations with others.4) Speech Fluency/Stuttering: SLPs teach children strategies to control […]

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Using Music in Speech Therapy for Children with ASD

  Is music a useful tool in speech therapy when working with children with ASD? Yes, when using other valuable treatment methods in addition. Music can be used to help establish joint attention, learn words, take turns, imitate, follow-directions, and ask and answer questions. It is a stimulant therefore it helps enhance memory which leads to an increase in attention and alertness. This is extremely valuable when teaching new concepts to children! Read more about it in the links below. file:///C:/Users/Valued/Downloads/Arntson-2.pdf https://blog.asha.org/2018/04/18/using-music-activities-to-teach-social-skills-in-young-people-with-autism/

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Incorporating Language into Daily Routines

  Daily routines (e.g. bathing, meals, shopping, car rides, getting dressed, etc.) provide great opportunities for language development in natural settings. Within these routines, children learn how their worlds are organized, begin to associate words/phrases with specific activities, make sense of social interactions, and practice participating in conversations. Through repetition of routines, children gain confidence and gradually take on more active roles. If a parent waits for the child to start a routine, such as squeezing the toothpaste on the toothbrush, the child can begin to understand his/her role as an initiator. A child’s motivation to understand is heightened in a situation in which he/she is an active participant. In addition, as specific vocabulary is repeatedly attached to an experience […]

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The science of reading

A cognitive scientist, Mark Seidenberg, at the University of Wisconsin, Madison found that only a third of the nation’s schoolchildren read at grade level. He cites that the way children are taught to read is disconnected from how language and speech actually develop in a child’s brain. The current research shows that reading success depends on linking print to speech. Skilled reading is associated with children’s spoken language, grammar and the vocabulary they already know. Seidenberg claims that the basic science (of reading) does not go into the preparation for teachers and argues that literacy is not an “either/or” of phonics and whole language. He claims that children need both.

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