Reading Comprehension: Questions and Strategies

Do SLPs work on reading comprehension?

Yes, SLPs are responsible for oral language (comprehension and expression) and literacy (reading, writing, and spelling). We can offer relevant skills for reading comprehension because we have knowledge of language subsystems (syntax, semantics, morphology, pragmatics) and development. SLPs understand how oral language skills transfer to reading.

What is reading comprehension?

Reading comprehension is a complex and active process where the reader applies meaning to what they read.

What skills are involved in reading comprehension?

  • Attention/memory
  • Decoding
  • Fluency
  • Background/world knowledge
  • Word/vocabulary knowledge

What strategies can help develop reading comprehension abilities?

There are many evidenced-based strategies that can support children with reading comprehension difficulties. The type of text (narrative or expository) can influence which type of strategies to use, as well as, the area of deficit.

  • Active-prior/background knowledge – making connections between existing knowledge and new information. Use a Know/Want to Know/Learned (KWL) organizer which helps children think about their own experiences and make relevant connections to new information.
  • Questioning answering – teaches children to ask questions about the text prior to reading and answer them after reading.
  • Comprehension monitoring – Used with expository texts primarily. Helps children determine if they are/are not understanding the text. When children are not understanding, they need to utilize “fix up” strategies. The therapist models the process, teaches the child to look back in the text, re-read, question answering, and look up words.
  • Mental Image/Visualize – In this technique you ask the reader build images in their mind of the text.
  • Story/text structure – This strategy can be used with both expository and narrative story structure but the way it is taught differs.

o   Expository – helps kids look for the language used in different expository text structures (sequence, compare/contrast, problem solving, procedural, enumeration, classification).

o   Narrative – teaching kids to look for the setting, characters, problem, and solution.

 

 

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