Listening to Audiobooks with your Child

Audiobooks are a fun and engaging way for your child to practice their listening comprehension and literacy skills. Find a book that is of interest to your child and listen to the book together. You can stop the book a few times to ask your child questions about what has happened, make predictions for what will happen next, and to summarize what has happened so far. After finishing the book, your child can retell the story to someone who did not listen to it, illustrate the story, or act it out.

https://gravitybread.com/books-and-mealtime/benefits-of-audio-books-for-children-with-special-needs/

Using Picture Books to Develop Vocabulary

November is National Picture Book Month, and the perfect time to introduce some new stories or well-loved classics to your child.

A 2016 study by Dominic Massaro, psychology professor at the University of California, Santa Cruz, suggests that while the amount of spoken language parents use with their children can increase their vocabulary, reading to them is even more effective.

Picture books contain richer language and less common vocabulary than we use in our everyday speech.  Giving a simple definition for unfamiliar words found in a story and pointing to the illustrations will help your child understand what the word means and help to build their vocabulary.  You can make learning new words even more fun by acting out or demonstrating what a word means. Make shared picture book reading part of your daily routine.  If you have older children, they can share books with their younger siblings-or you can all read together. Taking turns, listening and asking questions are all skills that will help your child when he starts learning to read.

The Books4All Blog has great book recommendations and suggestions for how to use them to promote language development.  Check out their website here:  http://all4mychild.com/books/

Rapport in a clinic-based setting

Some speech therapists may define ‘rapport’ as being well-liked by the clients they serve. According to Webster’s International Dictionary, rapport is defined as a transient “relationship characterized by harmony, accord, and affinity.” Three qualities have consistently been identified which help establish rapport in the therapy setting- empathy, respect, and warmth.

Research shows that the outcomes of treatment tend to be predicted by the quality of a therapist and client relationship. Positive relationships between therapists and their clients often yield positive outcomes and progress within therapy. For speech therapists, relationships with clients matter just as much as the actual purposes of therapy. Research into therapist-client relationships suggests that children are often more able to remember their therapist’s personality rather than the tasks they completed in a given session. In a study of therapist-client relationships, parents rated overall rapport in the school setting as lower than in a more private, individualized setting. Research shows that the key to developing rapport especially with young children is to integrate play with work and to make therapy as child-oriented as possible. Rapport is often established in the earliest parts of therapy but is what ensues throughout the duration of therapy. Research shows that rapport must not just be established at the very beginning, but must also be maintained over time. As therapists at Wee Speech, P.C, we are as intentional in developing rapport as we are in providing treatment to our clients because the attitude clients have about therapy sets the stage for what they can achieve.

 

Sources:

Establishing Rapport with Young Children During Speech and Language Diagnostic Evaluation (Geraldine Pattison, Thomas Powell)-National Student Speech Language Association Journal, Volume 17, 77-80 (1989-1990)