Making Speech and Language Homework Fun

It can be difficult to get your child to practice their speech homework at home. There are some ways to make their homework a little more fun and motivating. You can turn their homework into a search and find game. Make binoculars out of a paper towel roll and have your child search for their speech sounds or vocabulary words. When they spot one of their words, they have to tell you what they found. This game can be used with any speech and language homework your child has. This is just one way to make practicing speech and language at home a little more fun.

Leis, Kelly. Let’s Go on a Word Safari. The ASHA Leader, July 2018, Vol. 23, 6. doi:10.1044/leader.GL.23072018.6.

https://leader.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=2687267

Tongue Thrust – What is it?

Tongue thrust also referred to as a “reverse swallow” is a common orofacial myofunctional disorder. It is a pattern where the tongue protrudes between the teeth while eating, speaking, or at rest.

Causes

There are many possible causes of tongue thrust including:

  • Oral habits – thumb/finger sucking, extended pacifier use, etc.
  • Respiratory issues – enlarged tonsils/adenoids, allergies, mouth breathing, etc.
  • Premature loss of baby teeth which allows the tongue to move forward into the spaces created by missing teeth
  • Difficulty with tongue coordination
  • Heredity

Effects of Tongue Thrust

Over time, a tongue thrust can affect your child’s speech and the alignment of their teeth. When the tongue continually presses against the teeth, it can push the teeth out of alignment requiring orthodontics. After orthodontics, if the tongue thrust is not corrected, it can push the teeth out of alignment again. It also can affect a child’s speech. The most common articulation errors are “s,” “z,” “j,” “ch,” and “sh.”

Diagnoses and Treatment

A speech-language pathologist may diagnose tongue thrust after evaluating the child for speech sound errors. If the child does not display any speech sound errors, the diagnoses may come from a dentist or orthodontist.

Treatment will depend on the child’s individual needs. The SLP may refer to other professionals to correct any additional needs that may be underlying or contributing to the tongue thrust pattern. Generally, treatment focuses on eliminating any negative oral habits, learning a new habitual rest posture, establishing a new swallow pattern, and correcting any speech sound production errors.

References:

https://blog.asha.org/2011/02/25/tongue-thrust-and-treatment-of-subsequent-articulation-disorders/

https://pammarshalla.com/frontal-lisp-and-reverse-swallow/

https://www.speechbuddy.com/blog/speech-therapy-techniques/what-is-tongue-thrust/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Keeping Your Voice Healthy

Voice is so important to our ability to communicate and express ourselves. Many people don’t realize that there are behaviors that can help or hurt normal vocal functioning. The National Institute of Health provide a list of helpful vocal hygiene tips to prevent voice problems:

o   Drink water: The vocal folds move best when the body is well-hydrated,

o   Limit caffeine: Caffeine is drying to the entire body. Cutting back on these drinks can help keep your vocal folds hydrated.

o   Don’t overuse your voice:Doing a lot of talking, especially in noisy situations (sporting events, restaurants, bars, parties, social gatherings, industrial settings) can be tiring for your vocal folds. Give yourself voice breaks or moments when you don’t use your voice for a while to let your voice rest.

o   Avoid extremes: Try not to use extremes of your vocal range, such as screaming or whispering. Both can put stress on your voice.

o   Avoid throat-clearing: Throat clearing and coughing are traumatic to the vocal folds and can contribute to a vocal injury.

o   Use a humidifier: This is particularly important for the winter months when the air is dry. Generally inhaling or breathing steam helps the voice box stay moist and can be very soothing to irritated vocal folds.

o   Practice good breathing: Take deep breaths from the chest to support talking or singing. Don’t rely on the throat alone to avoid straining the voice.

o   Consider the effects of medication: Many medications, such as cold and allergy medications, are drying to the body. Try to avoid these medications to help your body stay hydrated or drink extra water while taking them.

https://www.nidcd.nih.gov/health/taking-care-your-voice