5 Reasons to Use Books for Practically Any Speech Language Skill

 

For parents who are wondering how they can work on their child’s speech and language goals at home, Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP from the ASHA Leader has identified five reasons that books are all you need! The reasons cited are:

1)    Books provide a natural context for learning vocabulary: Research has found that children’s books contain approximately twice as many infrequently used or rare words than in conversation and also provide a model of more advanced grammatical structures.

2)    Books are efficient: A single book can target multiple communication skills.

3)    Books are convenient: Children’s books are portable and typically low-cost.

4)    Books are fun: Choosing a story that a child is interested in and motivated to read can facilitate learning language and carryover of those skills.

5)    They do not have LED screens: A growing body of evidence suggests negative effects of screen time in young children, particularly speech and language delays, disruptions in sleep patterns and mood swings.

For the full article and a list of books to read for each speech and language skill, click the link below!

http://leader.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=2664650

Language Opportunities in the Kitchen!

 

When you are cooking in the kitchen, many of your children are curious and want to help.  It is often difficult to have a child participate in the cooking process due to safety and height of counters. It is also hard to cook with an active toddler running around the house. This has all changed! A new product has been developed that allows your child to be at the level of the countertop safely. Whether or not your child is old enough to actively cook, the kitchen is a place where you can model/incorporate many language skills. Many companies make a version of this product and we have even seen people making their own.  The kitchen is a beautiful place for language so we wanted to share this product!

https://www.amazon.com/Guidecraft-Kids-Kitchen-Helper-Adjustable/dp/B000SQNAQC/ref=pd_lpo_vtph_bs_img_1?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1&refRID=DDNQSTAAQ7TCKPQHETR0

Home Literacy Activities and Executive Functioning

Researchers from the University of Washington recently conducted a 5-year longitudinal study of 241 families to study home literacy and its impacts. The participants included a group of first- to fifth graders and a group of third- to seventh graders. The study found that children with higher reading and writing achievement at school engaged in more reading and writing activities at home. Parental rating scales also indicated that children’s ability to self-regulate attention spans remained consistent throughout the study, however, executive functioning skills including goal-setting, often improved.