Fun and Enriching Spring Outings for Kids around Chicago

Now that the weather has warmed up, you and your children may be eager to get outside and enjoy what the city has to offer. During these outings, you can encourage carry-over of your child’s specific speech and language goals (e.g., expanding vocabulary, formulating sentences, describing interesting objects, retelling events, answering questions, practicing words with certain speech sounds) while having fun with the family!

  • For an outing just beyond your front door, take a nature walk with your child and discuss what you see. Take notice of plants growing, bugs crawling, birds chirping, and animal tracks.
  • It’s always fun and free to visit Lincoln Park Zoo. Go on Wednesdays and Fridays for free sing-alongs with Mr. Singer.
  • Take advantage of free museum days for Illinois residents. Check out Sue the T. Rex at the Field Museum, the mirror maze at MSI or the underwater critters at Shedd for free!
  • Visit Old Town School of Folk Music on Saturdays to take part in group singing and instrument-playing. You don’t need to be enrolled in a class to join the fun!
  • Kids can learn about animals and pretend to be a variety of forest creatures at Animal Secrets at Kohl Children’s Museum.
  •  Troll Hunt opens May 1st at Morton Arboretum. Families can watch the giant wood trolls being built for two weeks on the arboretum grounds before they’re finished on June 22.

    On May 12, a 7,500-square-foot Model Railroad Garden opens at the Chicago Botanic Garden.

These are just some of the ideas, compiled from https://www.mommynearest.com/edition/chicago/article/50-free-things-to-do-with-kids-in-chicago.

Sesame Street Theme Park for Kids with Autism

Sesame Place, a “Sesame Street”-themed amusement park in Pennsylvania, is the first theme park to get Certified Autism Center (CAC) designation. The park stated: “It is our goal to provide every family with an enjoyable and memorable visit, and we are proud to offer specialized services to guests with autism and other special needs.”

The theme park provides its staff members with autism sensitivity and awareness training in areas like sensory awareness, motor skills, program development, social skills, communication, environment and emotional awareness. Each ride at Sesame Place is ranked using a special sensory scale (1-10). Additionally, the park offers noise-cancelling headphones, ride accessibility, and quiet rooms and low-sensory areas to accommodate its patrons. This is a very exciting development for families of children with autism, as they now have an opportunity to attend a theme park that caters to their child’s specific needs while offering an interesting and meaningful experience.

View the links below to read more about Sesame Place and visit the website!

https://www.cbsnews.com/news/sesame-place-becomes-worlds-first-theme-park-designated-as-a-certified-autism-center/

https://sesameplace.com/philadelphia/

5 Reasons to Use Books for Practically Any Speech Language Skill

 

For parents who are wondering how they can work on their child’s speech and language goals at home, Shari Robertson, PhD, CCC-SLP from the ASHA Leader has identified five reasons that books are all you need! The reasons cited are:

1)    Books provide a natural context for learning vocabulary: Research has found that children’s books contain approximately twice as many infrequently used or rare words than in conversation and also provide a model of more advanced grammatical structures.

2)    Books are efficient: A single book can target multiple communication skills.

3)    Books are convenient: Children’s books are portable and typically low-cost.

4)    Books are fun: Choosing a story that a child is interested in and motivated to read can facilitate learning language and carryover of those skills.

5)    They do not have LED screens: A growing body of evidence suggests negative effects of screen time in young children, particularly speech and language delays, disruptions in sleep patterns and mood swings.

For the full article and a list of books to read for each speech and language skill, click the link below!

http://leader.pubs.asha.org/article.aspx?articleid=2664650