April 2018

In the Clinic

Summer scheduling forms will be out soon.

Watch your email for the link.

 

We want to hear your thoughts! Please drop us a line in the suggestion box in the waiting room.


This Month

On the

Wee Speech Website:

 

App of the Month

WH Question Cards

Word Wall

April words, definitions, sentences and activities to print.

 

April Blog Postings

 

In the Waiting Room

Guess How Many?This month's winner is Ryan H!

Congratulations

Ryan H! Children (and siblings) are encouraged to fill out a slip each month with their guess. (Don’t forget your last name or initial.). The envelope for guesses is on the wall next to the book and toy bins in the Clinic waiting room. The drawing is at the end of the month and a special prize awaits the winner!!

Good Luck!!

 

April Birthdays!!

Eli B.

Leif B.

Meira C.

Shimmy H.

Quinn H.

Wren M.

Luca O.

Shimmy O.

Everett W.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

April 2018 edition of the Wee Speech Newsletter.

 


IEP Meetings from an SLP’s Perspective

Many families, even those who have been through the process before, feel nervous about Individual Education Plan (IEP) meetings. As a speech-language pathologist who has worked in both the public school and private clinic settings, I know how important an IEP meeting can be in setting your child up for a successful school year. I want to share what I have learned through my experiences in hopes that these tips will allow you to feel prepared and ready for your child’s next IEP meeting.

First, I encourage you to have an open-mind. It is important to understand that each team member attending the IEP meeting wants the best for your child. Every team member brings a unique perspective to the table. Listen to what they have to share and don’t be afraid to share your own thoughts and ideas too. As a parent, you are the most important member of the team. Since teachers and therapists may only see your child in the school setting, you should share how your child participates in the world outside of school. All of this information can be used to ensure your child has an appropriate educational plan with the necessary supports and accommodations.

Second, ask questions! There may be some confusing language or unfamiliar terms used during the IEP meeting. If something doesn’t make sense or you need clarification, ask! Bring a notebook so that you can write down questions throughout the meeting. Sometimes the process moves fast and writing down questions may help you recall what you want to discuss.

Remember to use your private speech-language pathologist before and after the IEP meeting to support your questions and ensure that your child is receiving the services you desire.    

If you’re unsure about what to expect, you’re not alone! This website (link below) provides a collection of helpful tips, tools, and checklists to prepare for your child’s IEP meeting. Check out these great resources including how to get organized, questions you should ask, what to bring to the meeting, legal FAQs, and so much more!
https://www.understood.org/en/school-learning/special-services/ieps/iep-boot-camp-getting-ready-for-your-childs-iep-meeting

By: Stephanie Marcus M.S., CCC/SLP

Summer Camps, Clinics and Intensives
Registration begins soon. Check out our clinic wide flyer to see all the fabulous opportunities we have planned!

Comings and Goings
We bid farewell to Whitney Klein as she leaves us to return to a school based position. Janelle Snyder who has been with us on a part time basis will now be joining our team as a full time therapist.

Pictures! We want Pictures!
Did you take a fabulous trip over spring break, visit some local museums or participate in fun events? Send a few pictures in with your child so that your child's therapist can use them in his/her therapy session. Personal pictures of family and events are great tools for speech and language therapy!


What Are We Blogging about in April?

Incorporating language into daily routines. Daily routines (e.g. bathing, meals, shopping, car rides, getting dressed, etc.) provide great opportunities for language development in natural settings...(more)

Laura Drower & Julie Levin
Wee Speech, P.C.

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Physical Therapy Notes
Lisa Barich PT

If you have any additional questions please contact Lisa Barich PT at barichlisag@gmail.com
(773)616-7638
barichlisag@gmail.com
lisabarichpt.wix.com/lisabarichpt

For more information contact Lisa Barich, PT